Sunday, February 10, 2013

Spanish Omelet II

In a chopping bowl place two nice large ripe tomatoes, first peeling them; one large or two medium-sized white Texas onions, two sprigs of parsley, and one large green-bell pepper, first removing most of its seeds. 

Chop these ingredients well together quite fine, turn them into a saucepan and let them cook over rather a brisk heat until quite soft. Put no water in this mixture. Add a tablespoon of olive oil or of butter before it begins to cook and season well with salt and red pepper.

Make the omelet the same as the plain one, but use water instead of milk in mixing it, and only use two tablespoons of water for the six eggs required.

After the eggs are sufficiently beaten, mixed, and in the pan over the fire, and when the edges begin to stiffen, cover the surface of the omelet to within an inch of the edge with the cooked vegetables. Fold the omelet quickly and turn it on a hot platter.

Pour around it all the vegetables left in the pan and serve.

Also see Spanish Omelet 
 

Sunday, January 13, 2013

Sticky Cinnamon Buns

From  "Mrs. Wilson's Cook Book, Numerous New Recipes Based on Present Economic Condition", by Mrs. Mary A. Wilson, 1920.

Scald one cup of milk and then place:

  • Four tablespoonfuls of shortening
  • One-half cupful of sugar
  • One teaspoonful of salt
 
in the mixing bowl, and pour over it the scalded milk. Stir to thoroughly mix and then cool to 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Now dissolve one-half yeast cake in one-half cupful of water 80 degrees Fahrenheit, and when the milk is at the proper temperature, add six cupfuls of flour and work to a smooth dough. Place in a well-greased bowl, turning the dough around in the bowl so that it will be thoroughly coated with shortening. Cover and let rise three and one-half hours.

Now pull the sides of the dough into the centre and punch down, turning the dough over. Let rise again for one hour, then turn on a moulding board and divide the dough in half. Knead each piece into a ball. Cover and let rise or spring for ten minutes. Now roll out one-quarter inch thick, using a rolling pin. Brush with melted shortening and sprinkle well with brown sugar, using [pg 21] about one cupful. Now dust with two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon and spread over the prepared dough one and one-half cupfuls of currants or small seedless raisins. Begin at the edge and roll like a jelly-roll. Cut in pieces one and one-half inches thick and then place in prepared pans and let rise for one hour. Then bake in a moderate oven for forty minutes.

To prepare the pan for the cinnamon buns:

Grease the pan very thickly with shortening and then spread one cupful brown sugar and one-half cupful of currants or small seedless raisins evenly over the bottom of the pan. Place buns in pan and let rise for one hour in a warm place, then bake in a moderate oven for thirty-five minutes.

Now for the trick. When the buns are baked, brush the pastry board with shortening, then place

Two tablespoonfuls of brown sugar,
One tablespoonful of water

in a saucepan, mix thoroughly, and then bring to a boil. Now, just as soon as the buns are baked, turn from the pan at once and brush well with the prepared syrup, brushing the bottom with the syrup, as brushing the candied part of the buns prevents it from hardening. Let cool and then use.